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Thanks for stopping by! Here on BECOMING LOLA I share stories on becoming minimalist, as well as living a pure clean life as a style-obsessed digital nomad with a no BS approach to ethical fashion + travel. Grab a glass of wine and start here: Building A Minimalist Wardrobe.

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on the topic of attainable couture for the youthful modern woman


While lazily perusing through the archives of some of my daily blog reads, I came across Joy expressing her delight with Giambasta Valli's consistency and quiet elegance, but that she too feels haute couture is a dying art form making a mockery of its former glorious self with the likes of Lindsay Lohan designing for Emanuel Ungaro among other inexcusable marketing efforts, and that while some designers are worth her infatuation, she's too young to even dare step out in their concoctions as of yet. This got me thinking about my post yesterday on couture being a sustainable option, and how the younger set (like Dead Fleurette) subtly embrace the concept of couture or high fashion pieces by incorporating it into their wardrobe where it counts. And while I do fawn over French style aesthetics, I've come to realize this week that my love for Scandinavian fashion runs deeper than my love for their sense of home design style (sterile white rooms anyone?). When assessing the most notorious group of women who pair the avant-garde with refined minimalism, Danish definitely come to mind. And with that, I was as giddy as a school girl to discover Bloggers Wardrobe which is a link that seems to bind all my beloved Scandi style bloggers together. While ACNE jeans by the dozen is a staple in wardrobes the world over, it truly is the accessories, knits, and outlandish ornate details that make Nordic fashion designers quite appealing.

I'm still exploring the brands that make up Bloggers Wardrobe, and have not seen which ones offer custom fashion besides GAIA which designs exquisitely tailored bespoke knitwear that feature vintage fabrics and are handmade in one-off collections, but you can imagine my pleasant surprise to discover an ethical Swedish designer taking cues from New York for her latest 24-Hour dress collection, a design duo focusing on luxurious natural and sustainably-sourced materials, and the renowned young shoe brand Finsk, which also uses locally sourced by-product leathers for their ethical production of architecturally stunning handcrafted shoes hailing from ateliers in Brazil.

What do you think? Are there certain designers out there producing attainable couture fashion that align with your wardrobe aesthetics?

11 comments

  1. Amazing post! So great:)

    Win a pair of sunglasses:
    http://theprintedsea.blogspot.de/2013/05/firmoo-giveaway.html

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    1. Hi Ira, thanks for stopping by but please see my commenting guidelines below next time that requests no links to your giveaways in comments on my blog. I try to keep comments meaningful and without spam. Thanks!

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  2. that's a beautiful picture

    http://www.ohmydior.org/

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  3. I discovered your blog today - it is beautiful in more ways than one : )
    As a broke student, anything that might be deemed attainable is still, very sadly, not attainable for me (as it is, I struggle to fund my coffee habit, let alone desire for couture clothing!). But when I enter the real world, there are definitely some lovely NZ ethical designers out there I really like, and who'll I'll support with my moolah!

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    1. Thanks so much Natalia, that's so very kind. I do try :)
      And totally here you on the broke student front. But at least you're a broke Masters student! A step up right! Who are the NZ designers? I am always looking to NZ and AU. They lead the pack. Then Sweden.

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  4. Oh, how I wish I were so fashionably inclined...couture is something I can only dream about. *sigh* Is Mommy couture such a thing?

    I do love the simplicity and classic nature of Parisian fashion and am trying to invest in more timeless pieces. If you love Scandinavian fashion, have you checked out the Greengate line from Uniqlo? As much as I love dressing up, I love comfort and Uniqlo delivers when it comes to comfort and fit (currently, the Greengate line is on sale!)

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    1. Haha, mommy couture would be fun! But I think I confused people with repeating the word couture too much, because it literally just means someone making your clothes for you. So in a way, being a new mom...that would be ideal! I've been reading how that is the one time wardrobe fluxuation is such a headache. At least starting with timeless high quality is a start.

      And no never heard of that, I will definitely check out the line. Thanks for mentioning it. I am fond of Uniqlo as well.

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  5. Thank you for your sweet comment on my blog.

    I write about couture a lot and it's certainly where a lot of my style inspiration comes from. Having an understanding of workmanship really helps me seek out quality pieces. Isabel Toledo is one of my favorite designers and I recently had a chance to hear her speak about her process. It's very sustainable and small. There's a connection with the designer. If they do a dress, they maybe do 20 of one dress. To me that's true luxury. She could only dream of producing her garments in a factory. I love Alaia for the same reason and when you look at construction,it's very much couture in the way he's working and sourcing materials.

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    1. I know, and its fantastic! That's why I am such an avid new fan because I didn't notice at first when I was reading your archives. Its so wonderful to meet other bloggers out there understanding the relevance and meaning of couture and how it transcends the runways and Paris.

      So jealous btw, would love to have seen Toledo! Nice to know its still an intimate production. Will always be an Alaia fan. Martin Margiela as well.

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  6. You graced my blog with a visit at just the right time! You and I share many of the same thoughts, except you articulate them so much better. I also admire Scandinavian fashion, and have also been thinking about culling my wardrobe down along the lines of a French minimalist wardrobe, or at least a Project 333 (http://theproject333.com/) or 30X30 (http://www.kendieveryday.com/p/30x30-remix.html) kind of thing. Discovering your blog may be the additional motivation I need to go ahead and just do it already! Plus, your last post on sustainable couture really resonates with me, given the recent tragedy in Bangladesh and my desire to shop local and hand-crafted.

    Looking forward to reading more.
    Judy


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    1. Ah I'm glad Judy! If it wasn't for your thoughtful post on Jean's blog would have never discovered you. Thanks for stopping by. And it really warms me up to know what I wrote is resonating (and motivating? woo hoo!) with so many because it truly can move from being an aspirational lifestyle to an attainable one if we just took the time to understand where our clothes come from and how to shop within our standards, not just our means.

      Off to check out those links you mentioned. Never heard of it!

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