SLIDER

HEY GIRL, HEY!

Thanks for stopping by! Here on BECOMING LOLA I share stories on becoming minimalist, as well as living a pure clean life as a style-obsessed digital nomad with a no BS approach to ethical fashion + travel. Grab a glass of wine and start here: Building A Minimalist Wardrobe.

SUBSCRIBE AND NEVER MISS A POST!

how to clean out and empty a fashion wardrobe with common sense


I am so hopelessly infatuated with a few new blog discoveries this month that trying to embark on soaking up all the intelligent prose, cultural perspectives, and tasteful curations are more rewardingly distracting than sifting through eBay all night for ACNE in my size or Givenchy for less than $500 (which is like finding the gosh damn loch ness monster). But I digress. My new sister from another mother has clearly been found in Kali who not only analyzes the building of wardrobes and fashion consumption mindfully like Jess, but just so happens to be French. So...well...yeah, enough said. I think I've made it quite clear I surrender to all words uttered by French women. Why? Not because they are a superior bunch (ok well...perhaps, but then I get slapped for saying so) but because when you have never been steered wrong by someone, wouldn't you continue to listen? 

Such is the case for me and the French. From literature to fashion, gourmet delicacies to their take on community and family, I find my exploration of European tendencies a neverending love. And so I was quite enamoured with Kali's post briefly showcasing her wardrobe culling, or wardrobe emptying as some call it. Since I am doing the same as you saw here, it was only natural I take interest in her suggestions as well. I shall direct your attention there, because in all honestly the fashion stylist and editor in me finds it simply second nature, or even an innate ability since birth to be able to decipher what to keep, toss, and donate from an overflowing closet based on certain criterion I've established for myself after revisiting my sense of personal style, and articulating these tips for others sometimes seems more difficult for me than it should be. Kali simplifies it quite ingeniously, most specifically the notion of making five outfits out of one piece to see if its worth keeping. While its fantastically common sense to keep only items YOU WILL ACTUALLY WEAR (helloooo people) I also thought it makes for a great impulsion blocker while shopping- mentally pairing an item with pieces already back home. So even though I purchased this handmade dress from Etsy years ago (and in the end am deciding to part with since my curves have only doubled in volume since), it was inevitable that I would try Kali's tip on for size. Pun intended.

Ah yes, and I am a busy woman. I had time for only three outfit pairings. Hopefully she doesn't fail me. I really am held together by star stickers and pats on the back from teachers. 
IN ALL IMAGES Peplum dress by I'm Your Present worn as dress and a top
wearing M Patmos cashmere scarf as headwrap / thrifted skirt / vintage linen blazer / thrifted wool cardigan / Matt & Nat vegan satchel / Mink vegan sandals / cuff and necklace by Natalie Frigo / statement necklace by Elva Fields Kristinit camel coat 


What are your tips for emptying the closet? Do you hold onto pieces that never see the light of day or lack versatility?

4 comments

  1. Love them all, especially the orange scarf combo!

    x

    www.more-than-one-love.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  2. You know what Lola? I think I am in love with you, ha!

    You always look perfect, JEL :(

    This is an inspiring post though, I have 2 wardrobes and getting sick and tired of having "nothing to wear". I have attempted to clear out but manage to remove 2 items at a time as I just can't seem to let go!

    Halima

    xx

    ReplyDelete
  3. Tu es trop belle,j'adore ta petite robe blanche!!

    xx

    Jade de http://leblogmodedejadounette.over-blog.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Honey, you look fabulous in that white eyelet dress!!! CHIC!!!

    ReplyDelete

© Beconing Lola • by Maira G.